Here And There with Dave Marash

In Turkey, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is pressing forward with his plan to re-write the Constitution and give himself greater powers.  So far, he’s used a so-called coup his own National Security Advisor says he penetrated and set off pre-maturely to make it fail, as the justification for 40,000 arrests and more than 100,000 firings of government workers.  Meanwhile, Al-Monitor columnist Pinar Tremblay says the Turkish economy is in free fall.  Erdogan’s just cutting a deal to build fighter planes with UK Prime Minister Theresa May, but how will he pay for it? 

Direct download: HT020717TremblayPodcast.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm MDT

Becoming a so-called “sanctuary city” is a moral, political and, if President Trump has his way, financial choice.  Santa Fe, NM Mayor Javier Gonzales spells out the values behind his hometown’s decision not to co-operate with Federal Immigration authorities, except when a suspect is wanted on felony charges, and why he thinks Trump’s threats are mostly hot air.  The Mayor says the President is creating false fears of immigrant criminals committing violent crimes and even terrorism, when studies show sanctuary cities are actually safer than non-sanctuaries. 

Direct download: HT020617GonzalesPodcast.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm MDT

The National Football League insists, the economics of its 32 franchises is a 2-way street. The teams get grants from their host cities, and tax breaks.  But the League says it more than pays off in generated business, tourism and prestige.  Most economists disagree, saying football’ contributions don’t balance municipal expenditures. Ken Belson of the NY Times tells the story of one owner, Arthur Blank of the Super Bowl Atlanta Falcons who is investing a lot of his own money making his new stadium’s surrounding neighborhoods better places to live

Direct download: HT020217BelsonPodcast.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm MDT

The official estimate from the Russian Ministry of the Interior is that 40% of all violent crimes in Russia occur in a family setting.  You won’t be surprised that the Russian Parliament is working furiously to change the laws on domestic violence.  But their effort is to make the laws LESS protective to women, children and the elderly who are the usual victims.  If a beating doesn’t send someone to the hospital, the new law says, it’s not a crime.  A government poll says most Russians approve these changes.  Nataliya Vasilveya of the Associated Press Moscow bureau has been covering.

Direct download: HT020117VasilyevaPodcast.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm MDT